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Posts Tagged ‘guest speaker’

The lecture below originally scheduled for May 17th, 2012, has been postponed. The speaker, Ariel Rubissow Okamoto, is not able to come speak this month due to unforeseen circumstances.  We hope to have her later in the year. 

The UNnatural History of San Francisco Bay
Guest Speaker:  Ariel Rubissow Okamoto

Date TBD

Journalist and author Ariel Rubissow Okamoto will answer a few burning questions from her new book Natural History of San Francisco Bay: How do you “make” a wetland if you’re not Mother Nature? If you throw a dead body of the GG Bridge where will it end up? Why splashing in the surf off Crown Beach might you give something like poison oak?

Ariel Rubissow Okamoto is a freelance writer living in San Francisco, who has been writing about environmental issues for 25 years, more recently specializing in California water issues. You can find out more about Natural History of San Francisco Bay here.

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picture from Golden Gate Cetacean

Return of the Harbor Porpoises
Guest Speaker:  Bill Keener
7:30pm, Thursday, March 15th, 2012
FREE at the Randall Museum, 199 Museum Way, San Francisco, CA 

Bill Keener, cofounder of Golden Gate Cetacean Research, created to study the porpoise, will tell us of their disappearance by the 1940′s, the mystery of their unexpected return in recent years, and how you can help by reporting your porpoise sightings.

Bill’s experience includes work as a field observer for the harbor porpoise population study in the Gulf of the Farallones National Marine Sanctuary from 1987-1989.  He is an environmental lawyer and the former Executive Director of the Marine Mammal Center.

Read more about Bill and porpoises in Bay Nature magazine, Jul-Sep 2011, Safe Harbor, Welcoming Porpoises Back to San Francisco Bay.

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White Sturgeon in San Francisco Bay

The Sturgeon in San Francisco Bay:
How critical can a 10,000 year old Bay be for a 100 million year old fish?

Guest Speaker:  Michael McGowan
7:30pm, Thursday, February 16th, 2012
FREE at the Randall Museum, 199 Museum Way, San Francisco, CA 

Michael McGowan, fisheries oceanographer and aquatic ecologist, will discuss his research on how the ecology of the green and white sturgeon differ in their life history and in how they use the Bay.

White sturgeon are the largest fresh water fish in North America that can live over a hundred years and can grow to 20 feet long, and weigh 1500lbs. (more info)

Green sturgeon, up  to 7 feet long and 350lbs, seem to be a little more mysterious on the web, they are probably migratory salt water fish that probably spawn in fresh water. (more info)

Michael will fill in the details for us.

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The Golden Age of Mesopredators
Guest Speaker:  Glen Martin
7:30pm, Thursday, January 19th, 2012
FREE at the Randall Museum, 199 Museum Way, San Francisco, CA 

"intruder alert! intruder alert!" by slworking2

Glen Martin, former environmental reporter for the Chronicle, will recount how mid-level predators are thriving in the Bay Area.

You can get an intro to the subject through his Bay Nature article from July 1st of 2011, the Middle Way.

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Reclaiming the Art of Natural History 
Guest Speaker:  John (Jack) Muir Laws
7:30pm, Thursday, November 17th, 2011
FREE at the Randall Museum, 199 Museum Way, San Francisco, CA 

This is our last talk of 2011. We should have announcements about some of next year’s schedule soon.

The Coast Ranges extend north-south for over 600 miles, more than two-thirds the length of the state. The variety of elevations, rock types, and climate zones in this group of mountain ranges supports a remarkable diversity of plant and animal life. Through an illustrated lecture, John (Jack) Muir Laws will lead us on a virtual walk across the Coast Ranges, exploring delightful relationships between plants and animals as we go. Along the way, we will learn a three-step process that will help us see more and think like naturalists. Jack will also discuss some of the conservation challenges in the region and what stewards of nature are doing to confront them. Whether you’re a botanist, birder or hiker, don’t miss this great opportunity to enrich your next exploration along the coast!

Jack delights in exploring the natural world and sharing this love with others.  He has worked as an environmental educator for over 25 years in California, Wyoming, and Alaska.  He teaches classes on natural history, conservation biology, scientific illustration, and field sketching. He is trained as a wildlife biologist and is an associate of the California Academy of Sciences. He has written and illustrated books about the natural history of California including Sierra Birds: a Hiker’s Guide(2004), The Laws Guide to the Sierra Nevada (2007), and The Laws Pocket Guide Set to the San Francisco Bay Area (2009). He is a regular contributor to Bay Nature magazine with his “Naturalists Notebook” column.
Learn more at his website:

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Keeping Nature in the City
Guest Speaker:  Peter Brastow
7:30pm, Thursday, October 20th, 2011
FREE at the Randall Museum, 199 Museum Way, San Francisco, CA 

Nature in the City’s founder Peter Brastow shares his vision of how we can more meaningfully interact with the wild in our city: restoring natural areas in our neighborhoods and backyards and through projects like the Twin Peaks Bioregional Park and the Green Hairstreak Corridor.

Peter Brastow founded Nature in the City in 2005 with the idea of connecting urban people to where we live. Doing this would help the growing movement to conserve San Francisco’s natural areas and biodiversity, helping to carry ecological restoration and stewardship further. Peter had previously served as the Presidio’s National Park Service Ecological Restoration Specialist.

You can read more about Nature in the City and their projects at natureinthecity.org.

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San Francisco’s Changing Landscape
Guest Speaker:  Greg Gaar
7:30pm, Thursday, September 15th, 2011
FREE at the Randall Museum, 199 Museum Way, San Francisco, CA 

Greg Gaar will present over 100 historic images of the evolution of SF’ s native plant communities over the last 200 years. Greg will show the transition of our oak woodlands, sand dunes, coastal prairies, tidal marshes, lakes and creeks and efforts to preserve our natural heritage.

If you’ve seen any number of photos of San Francisco through history, chances are you’ve seen photos from Greg Gaar’s collection.

You can find many of them online, but also some also in a book San Francisco: A Natural History

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